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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 124-129

Patterns of antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient department and emergency room at a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Pharmaceutical Care, Pharmacy Research Unit, King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Medicine, Um Alqura Univerisity, Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Pharmacy, Um Alqura Univerisity, Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
5 Health Education Department, King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Muna K. A. Oqal
Department of Pharmaceutical Care, Pharmacy Research Unit, King Abdullah Medical City, P.O. Box 57657 Makkah, 21955
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: Research Center, King Abdullah Medical City, Conflict of Interest: We certify that there is no conflict of interest with any financial organization regarding the material discussed in the manuscript.

DOI: 10.4103/1658-631X.156419

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DOI: 10.4103/1658-631X.156419

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Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent and patterns of antibiotic prescription in the outpatient and the emergency departments of a tertiary care center in Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out by reviewing the pharmacy electronic database from March to May 2013. The World Health Organization core drug use indicators were used. A random sample of 200 OPD and ER antibiotic prescriptions was obtained for detailed patient file review. Results: A total of 3872 antimicrobial prescriptions were identified. This constituted 16.2% of all OPD and ER prescriptions; 10% of OPD prescriptions and 47% of ER prescriptions contained at least one antibiotic. More than 50% of antibiotic prescriptions were not associated with the type of infection on the database. Co-amoxiclav and fluoroquinolones were the most frequently prescribed antibiotics. Conclusion: The overall percentage of antibiotic prescriptions in the OPD and the ER at the tertiary care center in Makkah are acceptable, but the percentage in the ER far exceeded the overall rate. Guidelines are needed to rationalize the prescription of antibiotics in the OPD and the ER.


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