Saudi Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 223--229

Clinical practice and barriers of ventilatory support management in COVID-19 patients in Saudi Arabia: A survey of respiratory therapists


Jaber S Alqahtani1, Yousef S Aldabayan2, Mohammed D AlAhmari4, Saad M AlRabeeah4, Abdulelah M Aldhahir3, Saeed M Alghamdi4, Tope Oyelade5, Malik Althobiani6, Ahmed M Alrajeh2 
1 Respiratory Medicine, University College London, London, UK; Department of Respiratory Care, Prince Sultan Military College of Health Sciences, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
2 Respiratory Care Department, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia
3 Respiratory Care Department, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Respiratory Therapy, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
5 Division of Medicine, University College London, London, UK
6 Department of Respiratory Therapy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Jaber S Alqahtani
Department of Respiratory Care, Prince Sultan Military College of Health Sciences, Dammam

Objective: This study was conducted to determine the clinical practice and barriers of ventilatory support management in COVID-19 patients in Saudi Arabia among respiratory therapists. Methods: A validated questionnaire comprising three parts was distributed to all critical care respiratory therapists registered with the Saudi Society for Respiratory Care through the official social networks. Results: A total of 74 respiratory therapists completed the survey. The mean (±standard deviation) of intensive care unit beds was 67 ± 79. Clinical presentation (54%) and arterial blood gas (38%) were the two main diagnostic tools used to initiate ventilatory support. While protocols for the initiation of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV; 81%) were widely available, participants had limited availability of protocols for the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV; 34%) and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC; 34%). In mild cases of COVID-19, most respondents used HFNC (57%), while IMV was mostly used in moderate (43%) and severe (93%) cases. Regular ventilator check was mostly done every 4 h (57%). BiPAP (47.3%) and full-face masks (45.9%) were the most used mode and interface, respectively, while pressure-regulated volume control (55.4%) and pressure control (27%) were the most used mechanical ventilation modes for COVID-19 patients. In terms of use of proning, 62% used it on IMV, while 26% reported using awake proning. Staff shortage (51.4%), personal protective equipment (PPE) shortage (51.4%), increased workload (45.9%), inadequate training (43.2%) and lack of available protocols and policies (37.8%) were the main barriers. Conclusion: Ventilatory support management of COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia was inconsistent with the global practice, lacked uniformity, and there was limited use of standard protocols/treatment guidelines. Shortage of staff and PPE, increased workload and insufficient training were the most prevalent barriers.


How to cite this article:
Alqahtani JS, Aldabayan YS, AlAhmari MD, AlRabeeah SM, Aldhahir AM, Alghamdi SM, Oyelade T, Althobiani M, Alrajeh AM. Clinical practice and barriers of ventilatory support management in COVID-19 patients in Saudi Arabia: A survey of respiratory therapists.Saudi J Med Med Sci 2021;9:223-229


How to cite this URL:
Alqahtani JS, Aldabayan YS, AlAhmari MD, AlRabeeah SM, Aldhahir AM, Alghamdi SM, Oyelade T, Althobiani M, Alrajeh AM. Clinical practice and barriers of ventilatory support management in COVID-19 patients in Saudi Arabia: A survey of respiratory therapists. Saudi J Med Med Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 1 ];9:223-229
Available from: https://www.sjmms.net/article.asp?issn=1658-631X;year=2021;volume=9;issue=3;spage=223;epage=229;aulast=Alqahtani;type=0